Fall Semester 2017 71 instructional days
Open Registration Mon-Fri August 14-18
Move-In Wed August 16
Classes Begin Mon August 21
Labor Day Mon September 4
Thanksgiving Holiday Wed-Sun November 22-26
Classes End Fri December 1
Study Days Sat-Tue December 2-5
Exams Wed-Wed December 6-13
Winter Recess Thu-Sun December 14 – January 8
Spring Semester 2018 73 instructional days
Open Registration Thu-Fri January 4-5
Classes Begin Mon January 8
Martin Luther King’s Birthday Mon January 15
President’s Day Mon February 19
Spring Recess Sun-Sun March 11-18
Classes End Fri April 27
Study Days Sat-Tue April 28-May 1
Exams Wed-Wed May 2-9
Commencement Fri May 11
Summer Session 2018 58 instructional days
Registration Mon-Tue May 14-15
Classes Begin Wed May 16
Memorial Day Mon May 28
Independence Day Wed July 4
Classes End Tue August 7
Fall Semester 2016 71 instructional days
Open Registration Mon-Fri August 15-19
Move-In Wed August 17
Classes Begin Mon August 22
Labor Day Mon September 5
Thanksgiving Wed-Sun November 23-27
Classes End Fri December 2
Study Days Sat-Tue December 3-6
Exams Wed-Wed December 7-14
Winter Recess Thu-Sun December 15-January 8
Spring Semester 2017 73 instructional days
Open Registration Thu-Fri January 5-6
Classes Begin Mon January 9
Martin Luther King’s Birthday Mon January 16
President’s Day Mon February 20
Spring Recess Sun-Sun March 12-19
Classes End Fri April 28
Study Days Sat-Tue April 29-May 2
Exams Wed-Wed May 3-10
Commencement Fri May 12
Summer Semester 2017 57 instructional days
Registration Mon-Tue May 15-16
Classes Begin Wed May 17
Memorial Day Mon May 29
Independence Day Mon-Tue July 3-4
Classes End Tue August 8

GMG-2016-1Attached are the 2016 Game Management Guidelines, created by the USA Rugby High Performance Management Group.

USA Rugby Referees’ management has established guidelines to refereeing at all levels in USA Rugby. These guidelines enable players and referees to have a clearer approach to the game and to be more consistent in Law application throughout the country. They also reflect directives from World Rugby.

Also attached is the Protective Equipment and Clothing Guidelines.

[vc_row][vc_column width=”1/2″][vc_column_text]The object of the Game is that two teams of fifteen or seven players each, observing fair play according to the Laws and sporting spirit, should by carrying, passing, kicking and grounding the ball, score as many points as possible, the team scoring the greater number of points being the winner of the match.

The Laws of the Game, including the standard set of variations for Under 19 Rugby and Sevens Rugby, are complete and contain all that is necessary to enable the Game to be played correctly and fairly.

Rugby Union is a sport which involves physical contact. Any sport involving physical contact has inherent dangers. It is very important that players play the Game in accordance with the Laws of the Game and be mindful of the safety of themselves and others.

[/vc_column_text][us_btn text=”World Rugby Laws 2016 (pdf)” link=”url:http%3A%2F%2Fwww.usctrojanrugby.org%2Fwp-content%2Fuploads%2F2016%2F02%2FWorld_Rugby_Laws_2016_EN.pdf||target:%20_blank”][/vc_column][vc_column width=”1/2″][us_single_image image=”7052″ size=”medium” align=”center” link=”url:http%3A%2F%2Fwww.usctrojanrugby.org%2Fwp-content%2Fuploads%2F2016%2F02%2FWorld_Rugby_Laws_2016_EN.pdf||target:%20_blank” onclick=”custom_link”][/vc_column][/vc_row]

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_row_inner columns_type=”default” gap=”10″ background=”primary” img=”4676″ parallax=”vertical” parallax_bg_width=”110″ parallax_reverse=”yes” overlay=”black_50″ full_width=”yes”][vc_column_inner width=”1/2″][vc_column_text]

Props

What they do: Their primary role is to anchor the scrummage and provide lifting strength and support for the lineout jumpers. Also pivotal in rucks & mauls.

What they need: Upper-body strength to provide stability in the scrum, endurance, mobility and safe hands to maintain continuity of play.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”1/2″][us_single_image image=”5914″ size=”full”][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_row_inner][vc_column_inner][us_separator icon=”fa fa-chevron-down”][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_row_inner columns_type=”default” gap=”10″][vc_column_inner width=”1/2″][us_single_image image=”5916″ size=”full”][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”1/2″][vc_column_text]

Hooker

What they do: The hooker has two unique roles on the pitch as the player who wins possession in the scrum and usually throws the ball in to the lineout.

What they need: Great strength to withstand the physicality of the front row coupled with speed to get around the pitch and good throwing technique.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_row_inner][vc_column_inner][us_separator icon=”fa fa-chevron-down”][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_row_inner columns_type=”default” gap=”10″][vc_column_inner width=”1/2″][vc_column_text]

Locks

What they do: Locks win ball from lineouts and restarts. They drive forward momentum in the scrum, rucks and mauls providing a platform for attack.

What they need: The key characteristic is height. The locks are the giants of the team and combine their physicality with great catching skills and mobility.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”1/2″][us_single_image image=”5917″ size=”full”][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_row_inner][vc_column_inner][us_separator icon=”fa fa-chevron-down”][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_row_inner columns_type=”default” gap=”10″][vc_column_inner width=”1/2″][us_single_image image=”5919″ size=”full”][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”1/2″][vc_column_text]

Flankers

What they do: Their key objective is to win possession through turn-overs, using physicality in the tackle and speed to the breakdown.

What they need: An insatiable desire for big tackles and a no-fear approach to winning the ball. A combination of speed, strength, endurance and handling.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_row_inner][vc_column_inner][us_separator icon=”fa fa-chevron-down”][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_row_inner columns_type=”default” gap=”10″][vc_column_inner width=”1/2″][vc_column_text]

Number 8

What they do: The Number 8 must secure possession at the base of the scrum, carry the ball in open play, provide the link between the forwards and backs in attacking phases and defend aggressively.

What they need: Good handling skills are essential, as is a great awareness of space. Power and pace over short distances is crucial – gaining territory and field position for a quick release to the backs in attack.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”1/2″][us_single_image image=”5920″ size=”full”][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_row_inner][vc_column_inner][us_separator icon=”fa fa-chevron-down”][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_row_inner columns_type=”default” gap=”10″][vc_column_inner width=”1/2″][us_single_image image=”5921″ size=”full”][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”1/2″][vc_column_text]

Scrum Half

What they do: Provides the link between forwards and backs at the scrum and lineouts. A true decision-maker, the 9 will judge whether to distribute quick ball to the backs or keep it close to the forwards.

What they need: A multi-faceted position, the scrum half must be powerful, have explosive speed, all-round handling and kicking skills. The great 9s are highly confi- dent players, with excellent game understanding.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_row_inner][vc_column_inner][us_separator icon=”fa fa-chevron-down”][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_row_inner columns_type=”default” gap=”10″][vc_column_inner width=”1/2″][vc_column_text]

Fly Half

What they do: As the player who orchestrates the team’s performance, the 10 will receive the ball from the 9 and choose to kick, pass or make a break based upon split-second interpretation of the phase of play.

What they need: The ability to kick well out of hand, ideally on either foot, deft handling skills, pace, vision, creativity, communication skills, tactical awareness and the ability to perform under pressure.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”1/2″][us_single_image image=”5922″ size=”full”][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_row_inner][vc_column_inner][us_separator icon=”fa fa-chevron-down”][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_row_inner columns_type=”default” gap=”10″][vc_column_inner width=”1/2″][us_single_image image=”5923″ size=”full”][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”1/2″][vc_column_text]

Centers

What they do: The centers are key in both defense and attack. In defense they will attempt to tackle attacking players whilst in attack they will use their speed, power and creative flair to breach defenses.

What they need: The modern-day center is lean, strong and extremely quick. The position demands great attacking prowess, coupled with an intensity in contact to either retain or steal possession.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_row_inner][vc_column_inner][us_separator icon=”fa fa-chevron-down”][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_row_inner columns_type=”default” gap=”10″][vc_column_inner width=”1/2″][vc_column_text]

Wings

What they do: The wings are on the pitch to provide the injection of out-and-out pace needed to outrun an opponent and score a try. Also important to be solid in defense.

What they need: Pace. Wings will often find themselves in open space, when their number one priority is to press the accelerator and run for the line. Strength and good handling are an advantage too.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”1/2″][us_single_image image=”5924″ size=”full”][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_row_inner][vc_column_inner][us_separator icon=”fa fa-chevron-down”][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_row_inner columns_type=”default” gap=”10″][vc_column_inner width=”1/2″][us_single_image image=”5925″ size=”full”][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”1/2″][vc_column_text]

Fullback

What they do: Generally perceived as the last line of defense, the full back must be confident under a high ball, have a good boot to clear the lines and a enjoy the physicality required to make try-saving tackles.

What they need: Great handling skills, pace in attack and power in defence. An ability to join the line at pace to create an overlap and try-scoring opportunities for the winger.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_row_inner][vc_column_inner][us_separator icon=”fa fa-chevron-down”][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_row_inner][vc_column_inner][vc_column_text]39991-enz-1[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][/vc_column][/vc_row]

At a meeting in April 2015, the Laws Representation Group (LRG) considered the areas of the Game where, it had been agreed that Law amendments were not required but that current Law was to be enforced by match officials including:

1. FOUL PLAY

High Tackles and Neck contact – Law 10.4(e)

Every time the head or the neck is deliberately grabbed or choked, the offending player runs the risk of receiving a yellow or red card

Cleanouts around the neck must be penalised

Match officials should work together to ensure that foul play is strictly penalised and that player welfare is paramount

High tackles

[vc_video link=”http://www.usctrojanrugby.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/World RugbyLAGsMay2015HighTacklesAbovetheShoulder.mp4″]

Neck contact

[vc_video link=”http://www.usctrojanrugby.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/WorldRugbyLAGsMay2015NeckGrabs.mp4″]

Challenging players in the air – Law 10.4(i)

Play on – Fair challenge with both players in a realistic position to catch the ball. Even if the player(s) land(s) dangerously, play on
[vc_video link=”http://www.usctrojanrugby.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/WorldRugbyLAGsMay2015ContestinAir.mp4″]

  • Penalty only – Fair challenge with wrong timing – No pulling down
  • Yellow card – Not a fair challenge, there is no contest and the player is pulled down landing on his back or side
  • Red card – Not a fair challenge, there is no contest and the player lands on his head, neck or shoulder

[vc_video link=”http://www.usctrojanrugby.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/WorldRugbyLAGsMay2015FoulPlaycollisionsintheair.mp4″]

2. SCRUM

Scrum feed – Law 20.6(d)

[vc_video link=”http://www.usctrojanrugby.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/World Rugby LAGs May 2015 Scrum Feeds.mp4″]

  1. Ensure that all scrum feeds are credible
  2. Free Kick if clearly not straight
  3. Look for shoulders not being parallel
  4. Manage the situation

Communication – Law 20.4(e,f)

[vc_video link=”http://www.usctrojanrugby.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/WorldRugbyLAGsMay2015Scrumuseit.mp4″]

  1. If scrum is or becomes stationary
  2. If ball is available (No. 8 feet)
  3. The referee will call “use it”

3. MAUL

Sanction all players who join in front of the ball carrier – Law 17.4(c)

[vc_video link=”http://www.usctrojanrugby.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/WorldRugbyLAGsMay2015LineoutMaulClearlyinfrontofballcarrier.mp4″]

The ripper must be bound – it will be accidental offside

[vc_video link=”http://www.usctrojanrugby.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/WorldRugbyLAGsMay2015LineoutMaulRippermustbebound.mp4″]

usa-rugby-logoThe guidelines enable players and referees to have a clearer approach to the game and to be more consistent in Law application throughout the country, while also reflecting directives from World Rugby. The guidelines are to be distributed and applied nationally to all referees, referee performance reviewers, referee coaches, players/teams, coaches, and administrators for 2015.

Additionally, the first Sevens Game Management Guidelines have been introduced. They have been reviewed by World Rugby and given the green light.

Download Documents

usarr-gmg-2015-coverusarr-sevens-gmg-2015-coevr

World Rugby Law Book

World_Rugby_Laws_2015_EN-cover

[vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][vc_row_inner][vc_column_inner width=”1/2″][vc_column_text]USC’s official colors are Pantone 201C and Pantone 123C. These colors, designated as USC Cardinal and USC Gold, are equal in importance in identifying the university. All printed materials, whether printed on coated or uncoated stock, should match color to the coated Pantone chips. The Pantone Matching System, or PMS, is the definitive international reference for selecting, specifying, matching and controlling ink colors. It is strongly recommended that drawdowns be requested with each print job to ensure that the PMS colors are accurate. The correct and consistent use of USC’s official colors helps reinforce the university’s identity.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”1/2″][vc_column_text]

  • Note: Use PMS colors for printed materials and products only.

    PMS 201C

  • Note: Use PMS colors for printed materials and products only.

    PMS 123C

[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_row_inner][vc_column_inner width=”1/1″][us_separator icon=”fa fa-paint-brush”][vc_column_text]

Official Color Translations and Web Colors

[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text]

  • Printed Materials and Products

    PMS 201C

  • Do Not Use

    Direct CMYK Conversion
    C31 M88 Y51 K22

  • Uncoated print materials / products

    Proper Bridge
    CMYK Conversion
    C7 M100 Y65 K32

  • Web and screen

    Approved RGB Conversion
    R153 G0 B0
    Approved Hex: #990000

[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_row_inner][vc_column_inner width=”1/1″][vc_column_text]

  • Printed Materials and Products

    PMS 123C

  • Do Not Use

    Direct CMYK Conversion
    C0 M24 Y94 K0

  • Uncoated print materials / products

    Proper Bridge
    CMYK Conversion
    C0 M27 Y100 K0

  • Web and screen

    Approved RGB Conversion
    R255 G204 B0
    Approved Hex: #FFCC00

[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][/vc_column][/vc_row]