[vc_row][vc_column width=”1/2″][vc_column_text]The object of the Game is that two teams of fifteen or seven players each, observing fair play according to the Laws and sporting spirit, should by carrying, passing, kicking and grounding the ball, score as many points as possible, the team scoring the greater number of points being the winner of the match.

The Laws of the Game, including the standard set of variations for Under 19 Rugby and Sevens Rugby, are complete and contain all that is necessary to enable the Game to be played correctly and fairly.

Rugby Union is a sport which involves physical contact. Any sport involving physical contact has inherent dangers. It is very important that players play the Game in accordance with the Laws of the Game and be mindful of the safety of themselves and others.

[/vc_column_text][us_btn text=”World Rugby Laws 2016 (pdf)” link=”url:http%3A%2F%2Fwww.usctrojanrugby.org%2Fwp-content%2Fuploads%2F2016%2F02%2FWorld_Rugby_Laws_2016_EN.pdf||target:%20_blank”][/vc_column][vc_column width=”1/2″][us_single_image image=”7052″ size=”medium” align=”center” link=”url:http%3A%2F%2Fwww.usctrojanrugby.org%2Fwp-content%2Fuploads%2F2016%2F02%2FWorld_Rugby_Laws_2016_EN.pdf||target:%20_blank” onclick=”custom_link”][/vc_column][/vc_row]

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Props

What they do: Their primary role is to anchor the scrummage and provide lifting strength and support for the lineout jumpers. Also pivotal in rucks & mauls.

What they need: Upper-body strength to provide stability in the scrum, endurance, mobility and safe hands to maintain continuity of play.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”1/2″][us_single_image image=”5914″ size=”full”][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_row_inner][vc_column_inner][us_separator icon=”fa fa-chevron-down”][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_row_inner columns_type=”default” gap=”10″][vc_column_inner width=”1/2″][us_single_image image=”5916″ size=”full”][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”1/2″][vc_column_text]

Hooker

What they do: The hooker has two unique roles on the pitch as the player who wins possession in the scrum and usually throws the ball in to the lineout.

What they need: Great strength to withstand the physicality of the front row coupled with speed to get around the pitch and good throwing technique.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_row_inner][vc_column_inner][us_separator icon=”fa fa-chevron-down”][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_row_inner columns_type=”default” gap=”10″][vc_column_inner width=”1/2″][vc_column_text]

Locks

What they do: Locks win ball from lineouts and restarts. They drive forward momentum in the scrum, rucks and mauls providing a platform for attack.

What they need: The key characteristic is height. The locks are the giants of the team and combine their physicality with great catching skills and mobility.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”1/2″][us_single_image image=”5917″ size=”full”][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_row_inner][vc_column_inner][us_separator icon=”fa fa-chevron-down”][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_row_inner columns_type=”default” gap=”10″][vc_column_inner width=”1/2″][us_single_image image=”5919″ size=”full”][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”1/2″][vc_column_text]

Flankers

What they do: Their key objective is to win possession through turn-overs, using physicality in the tackle and speed to the breakdown.

What they need: An insatiable desire for big tackles and a no-fear approach to winning the ball. A combination of speed, strength, endurance and handling.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_row_inner][vc_column_inner][us_separator icon=”fa fa-chevron-down”][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_row_inner columns_type=”default” gap=”10″][vc_column_inner width=”1/2″][vc_column_text]

Number 8

What they do: The Number 8 must secure possession at the base of the scrum, carry the ball in open play, provide the link between the forwards and backs in attacking phases and defend aggressively.

What they need: Good handling skills are essential, as is a great awareness of space. Power and pace over short distances is crucial – gaining territory and field position for a quick release to the backs in attack.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”1/2″][us_single_image image=”5920″ size=”full”][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_row_inner][vc_column_inner][us_separator icon=”fa fa-chevron-down”][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_row_inner columns_type=”default” gap=”10″][vc_column_inner width=”1/2″][us_single_image image=”5921″ size=”full”][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”1/2″][vc_column_text]

Scrum Half

What they do: Provides the link between forwards and backs at the scrum and lineouts. A true decision-maker, the 9 will judge whether to distribute quick ball to the backs or keep it close to the forwards.

What they need: A multi-faceted position, the scrum half must be powerful, have explosive speed, all-round handling and kicking skills. The great 9s are highly confi- dent players, with excellent game understanding.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_row_inner][vc_column_inner][us_separator icon=”fa fa-chevron-down”][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_row_inner columns_type=”default” gap=”10″][vc_column_inner width=”1/2″][vc_column_text]

Fly Half

What they do: As the player who orchestrates the team’s performance, the 10 will receive the ball from the 9 and choose to kick, pass or make a break based upon split-second interpretation of the phase of play.

What they need: The ability to kick well out of hand, ideally on either foot, deft handling skills, pace, vision, creativity, communication skills, tactical awareness and the ability to perform under pressure.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”1/2″][us_single_image image=”5922″ size=”full”][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_row_inner][vc_column_inner][us_separator icon=”fa fa-chevron-down”][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_row_inner columns_type=”default” gap=”10″][vc_column_inner width=”1/2″][us_single_image image=”5923″ size=”full”][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”1/2″][vc_column_text]

Centers

What they do: The centers are key in both defense and attack. In defense they will attempt to tackle attacking players whilst in attack they will use their speed, power and creative flair to breach defenses.

What they need: The modern-day center is lean, strong and extremely quick. The position demands great attacking prowess, coupled with an intensity in contact to either retain or steal possession.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_row_inner][vc_column_inner][us_separator icon=”fa fa-chevron-down”][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_row_inner columns_type=”default” gap=”10″][vc_column_inner width=”1/2″][vc_column_text]

Wings

What they do: The wings are on the pitch to provide the injection of out-and-out pace needed to outrun an opponent and score a try. Also important to be solid in defense.

What they need: Pace. Wings will often find themselves in open space, when their number one priority is to press the accelerator and run for the line. Strength and good handling are an advantage too.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”1/2″][us_single_image image=”5924″ size=”full”][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_row_inner][vc_column_inner][us_separator icon=”fa fa-chevron-down”][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_row_inner columns_type=”default” gap=”10″][vc_column_inner width=”1/2″][us_single_image image=”5925″ size=”full”][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”1/2″][vc_column_text]

Fullback

What they do: Generally perceived as the last line of defense, the full back must be confident under a high ball, have a good boot to clear the lines and a enjoy the physicality required to make try-saving tackles.

What they need: Great handling skills, pace in attack and power in defence. An ability to join the line at pace to create an overlap and try-scoring opportunities for the winger.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_row_inner][vc_column_inner][us_separator icon=”fa fa-chevron-down”][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_row_inner][vc_column_inner][vc_column_text]39991-enz-1[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][/vc_column][/vc_row]

Thanks to our friends at Adverts4Autos and Canterbury USA for supplying our 2015 training gear.

DSC_0579

Joseph Krassenstein coolin it with our nations best ruggers @carlinisles and the sleepy @nkc_yasa2 - at Olympic Training Center.

Joseph Krassenstein coolin it with our nations best ruggers @carlinisles and the sleepy @nkc_yasa2 – at Olympic Training Center.

USA Rugby held its first open recruitment camp Saturday January 10, 2015, welcoming about 60 players to the Olympic Training Center in Chula Vista, Calif. The watchful eyes of National Team coaches and staff were there to monitor and conduct the event.

The day was broke up into three blocks, with the first being dedicated largely to measurements and tests – notating wingspan, hand size, 40-meter sprint times and yo-yo tests. The second portion was more of a skills assessment, seeing where everyone was with passing, track tackling, game sense and aerial ability, followed by feedback and instruction. The third block was a sped up version of the second, allowing coaches to judge the coachability of the attendees.

7s high performance manager Alex Magleby was pleased with the quality of attendees at the camp. There were a few potential diamonds in the rough coming from the club game, and a bevy of talented crossovers.

“There’s a couple of guys like that from a rugby perspective, and there’s a handful of crossovers who you could absolutely see them being coachable,” said Magleby. “They improved throughout the day, they have the physical tools and the physical ability, but how committed are they to really learning the game and getting into an academy or a high quality club team and really pushing over the next three months to learn the rugby side. Overall, quite impressive.”

Some of the crossovers had NFL, NCAA DI track and football experience. And a few of the camp’s standouts could be invited to the Eagles’ upcoming high performance camp coming up next week. Considering everything, Magleby was pleased with the first event, and optimistic about possibly duplicating it in the future.

“It was quite productive. You can imagine if just two of those guys end up becoming national team players in the short term, by short term three to six months, and if three to five of them increase the athletic pool in the next six to 18 months, it’s been quite successful,” he said.

“If we get more than that, awesome. There was probably a third of the guys in camp that at some stage could compete for a spot in the national team.”

– See more at: http://www.rugbytoday.com/elite/usa-rugby-recruitment-camp-success#sthash.LONrdbXl.dpuf

usa-rugby-logoThe guidelines enable players and referees to have a clearer approach to the game and to be more consistent in Law application throughout the country, while also reflecting directives from World Rugby. The guidelines are to be distributed and applied nationally to all referees, referee performance reviewers, referee coaches, players/teams, coaches, and administrators for 2015.

Additionally, the first Sevens Game Management Guidelines have been introduced. They have been reviewed by World Rugby and given the green light.

Download Documents

usarr-gmg-2015-coverusarr-sevens-gmg-2015-coevr

World Rugby Law Book

World_Rugby_Laws_2015_EN-cover

USC Rugby Players – if you are banged up or have a athletic medical concern, there are trainers that you can see for free at the Lyon Center.

  • Wednesday 3:30-5:30pm (Andrea, Shawna, Jess, Nathan – Athletic Trainers/DPT students)
  • Thursday 4:30-6:30pm (Garin – DPT/Sports Medicine PT resident)

Use this resource!

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_row_inner columns_type=”default” gap=”10″][vc_column_inner width=”1/2″][vc_column_text]Offside Player: Is offside when in front of the player carrying the ball. No blocking allowed in rugby.

Forward pass: Only lateral and backward passes are allowed in rugby. If the ball is passed forward a scrum will be awarded to the non-offending team.

Knock-On: A knock-on is when a player fumbles the ball forward. The non-infringing team is awarded a scrum.

Failure to release player/ball: After a tackle, the tackler must immediately release the ball carrier and the ball carrier must immediately release the ball. If either of these does not occur within a reasonable time a penalty is rewarded to the non-infringing team.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”1/2″][us_single_image image=”5936″ size=”full”][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_row_inner][vc_column_inner][us_separator icon=”fa fa-chevron-down”][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_row_inner columns_type=”default” gap=”10″][vc_column_inner width=”1/2″][vc_column_text]

What is a ruck?

A ‘ruck’ is what occurs after a player has been tackled. Both teams will compete for the ball by driving the other team away from the ball, allowing their players to pick it up out of the back and continue play. No, this is not just chaos, there are laws in the ruck!

Illegal action in the ruck: All players must join a ruck from their own side of the ball, through what is called a ‘gate’. They should not join the pile from the side, only the back. A penalty will be called if done incorrectly. If the ball becomes unplayable in a ruck and neither team is at fault, a scrum will be awarded to the team in possession of the ball prior to the ruck.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”1/2″][us_single_image image=”5928″ size=”medium”][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_row_inner][vc_column_inner][us_separator icon=”fa fa-chevron-down”][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_row_inner columns_type=”default” gap=”10″][vc_column_inner width=”1/2″][us_single_image image=”5929″ size=”full”][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”1/2″][vc_column_text]

Scrums

A scrum restarts play after a minor infringement like a knock on. It consists of eight players from each team (known as the pack) that bind together in three rows and interlock with the opposite team’s pack. The ball is then fed into the gap between the two forward packs. The packs then begin push against each other while the ‘Hooker’ tries to hook the ball back with their feet. Use of hands is not allowed inside the scrum.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_row_inner][vc_column_inner][us_separator icon=”fa fa-chevron-down”][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_row_inner columns_type=”default” gap=”10″][vc_column_inner width=”1/2″][vc_column_text]

Lineouts

A lineout restarts play after the ball has gone out of bounds. Players from each team line up in two lines that are parallel to the goal line and approximately one meter apart from each other. A player from the team not responsible for the ball going into touch then throws the ball between the lines. A player from each team is lifted up in order to catch the ball.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”1/2″][us_single_image image=”5930″ size=”full”][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_row_inner][vc_column_inner][us_separator icon=”fa fa-chevron-down”][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_row_inner columns_type=”default” gap=”10″][vc_column_inner width=”1/2″][us_single_image image=”5931″ size=”full”][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”1/2″][vc_column_text]

During the game

The goal of the game is to advance the ball forward through running, passing and kicking to carry the ball into your opponents ‘try zone’ and ground the ball for a ‘try’ (like a touchdown). The defense will use strategy, tackling and competing for the ball to prevent this from happening and try to recover possession of the ball.

Play to the whistle: Although resembling a bit of chaos, rugby is governed by a set of ‘Laws’, not rules, so the referee may interpret each situation a little differently according to circumstances.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_row_inner][vc_column_inner][us_separator size=”huge” icon=”fa fa-gavel”][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_row_inner columns_type=”default” gap=”10″][vc_column_inner width=”1/2″][vc_column_text]

Download the LAW Book

The object of the Game is that two teams of fifteen or seven players each, observing fair play according to the Laws and sporting spirit, should by carrying, passing, kicking and grounding the ball, score as many points as possible, the team scoring the greater number of points being the winner of the match.

The Laws of the Game, including the standard set of variations for Under 19 Rugby and Sevens Rugby, are complete and contain all that is necessary to enable the Game to be played correctly and fairly.

Rugby Union is a sport which involves physical contact. Any sport involving physical contact has inherent dangers. It is very important that players play the Game in accordance with the Laws of the Game and be mindful of the safety of themselves and others.[/vc_column_text][us_btn text=”Download the 2016 World Rugby Law Book” link=”url:http%3A%2F%2Fwww.usctrojanrugby.org%2Fwp-content%2Fuploads%2F2016%2F02%2FWorld_Rugby_Laws_2016_EN.pdf||target:%20_blank” icon=”fa fa-gavel”][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”1/2″][us_single_image image=”7052″ size=”medium” onclick=”custom_link” link=”url:http%3A%2F%2Fwww.usctrojanrugby.org%2Fwp-content%2Fuploads%2F2016%2F02%2FWorld_Rugby_Laws_2016_EN.pdf||target:%20_blank” animate=”afr” animate_delay=”0.6″][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_row_inner][vc_column_inner][us_separator type=”invisible”][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_row_inner columns_type=”default” gap=”10″][vc_column_inner width=”1/2″][us_single_image image=”5937″ size=”full” animate=”afl” animate_delay=”0.6″][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”1/2″][vc_column_text]

There’s an App for that!

Connect to the World Rugby Law Book digitally.[/vc_column_text][us_btn text=”World Rugby Law Book App” link=”url:https%3A%2F%2Fwww.google.com%2Furl%3Fsa%3Dt%26amp%3Brct%3Dj%26amp%3Bq%3D%26amp%3Besrc%3Ds%26amp%3Bsource%3Dweb%26amp%3Bcd%3D3%26amp%3Bcad%3Drja%26amp%3Buact%3D8%26amp%3Bved%3D0CCwQFjAC%26amp%3Burl%3Dhttps%253A%252F%252Fitunes.apple.com%252Fus%252Fapp%252Firb-laws-of-rugby%252Fid403213587%253Fmt%253D8%26amp%3Bei%3D6xanVJCnHcyrogTM2oDABA%26amp%3Busg%3DAFQjCNEhGaOQy2DnrY_xgDLGE56PyfDcfw%26amp%3Bsig2%3Dm9mDupoTij2vIFhBR2DXiQ%26amp%3Bbvm%3Dbv.82001339%2Cd.cGU|target:%20_blank” icon=”fa fa-gavel”][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][/vc_column][/vc_row]

RWC-2011-Official-Match-Ball-2This is my rugby ball. There are many others like it, but this one is mine. My rugby ball is my best friend. It is my life. I must master it as I must master my life. Without me, my rugby ball is useless. Without my rugby ball, I am useless. I must pass my rugby ball true. I must run faster than the opposition, who is trying to tackle me. I must fend him before he tackles me. I will. Before Coach I swear this creed: my rugby ball and myself are defenders of USC Rugby, we are the masters of the opposition, we are the saviors of my collegiate rugby career. So be it, until there is only one team standing. Fight on!

usc-trojans-sc-logoI agree to conduct myself in accordance with all rules and requirements of the team, the athletic conference in which my team participates, and USC, including the Code of Student Conduct. I also agree as follows:

  1. University Community – 
I will be a responsible and engaged member of the University community. I will strive to represent my team in and outside the classroom, and show respect for all members of the University and the broader community. I will lead by example. I will remember that both my own and my team’s reputations are at stake when I am participating in rugby competition, attending classes, and socializing with friends and others both in and outside of the University community.
  2. Academic Standing
 – I will assume full responsibility for my academic progress and achievement. I will make every effort to stay in good academic standing at the University. I will attend all my classes unless excused for team travel and competition or some other legitimate reason. I will seek additional academic help if necessary to improve or maintain my academic standing.
  3. Travel as a University Ambassador – 
When traveling for competitions or training as a representative of both USC and the rugby team, I will behave responsibly and portray a positive image of USC at all times.
  4. Cyberspace – 
I will not author, forward, or post vulgar or offensive notes, texts, photographs, or other content that reflect negatively on me, my team, other individuals, or the University, or that conflict with the spirit or intent of this Code or the Code of Student Responsibilities. Whenever possible, I will discourage others from posting text or photographs that could be deemed unflattering or damaging to my, or others’, reputation, or the reputations of the team or the University.
  5. Alcohol and Drug Use – 
I will not consume alcoholic beverages on team trips or athletic events. I will comply with the policies described in the USC University Statement on Illegal Drugs and Alcohol. I will not use or distribute banned substances, including illegal and “performance enhancing drugs,” or take prescription drugs unless they have been prescribed for me by a medical professional.
  6. Violence
 – I will not engage in and will not be tolerant of violent acts, including assaults on persons or property, hate crimes, hazing (addressed more fully below), stalking, sexual violence, or any other conduct prohibited by law or University policy. If I witness such acts perpetrated by others, I will report them to my coach or another University authority immediately. I acknowledge that the Rugby Team may, in its discretion, immediately suspend me from the team and prohibit me from practice and competition until further notice in the event I am accused of a crime of violence or sexual assault.
  7. Nonconsensual Sexual Contact
 – I will not initiate or engage in nonconsensual sexual contact or sexual harassment, and I acknowledge that all forms of harassment and non-consensual sexual contact are prohibited both by law and USC rules, described in more detail in the USC Sexual Harassment Policy.
  8. Hazing
 – I will not participate in hazing of any sort. I acknowledge that such acts, either in connection with membership on a University athletic team, participation in an informal or formal team activity, or for any other reason, are strictly prohibited. I will refrain from any act, whether physical, mental, emotional, or psychological, that subjects another person, voluntarily or involuntarily, to anything that may abuse, mistreat, degrade, humiliate, harass, or intimidate another person. Such acts may include, but are not limited to: forcing, requiring, or pressuring others to consume alcohol or any other substance; forcing, requiring, or pressuring others to involuntarily perform physical activities, tattoo, pierce, or shave any part of the body; forcing, requiring, or pressuring others to take part in an illegal or indecent activity; disturbing others during normal sleeping hours; or physically abusing others in any way.
  9. Remaining Informed of Expectations and Policies – 
I am responsible for my own behavior and for reading, understanding, and abiding by the policies applicable to me, including but not limited to the USC rule book and the Code of Student Responsibilities.

I understand that failure to conduct myself responsibly, as stated and implied by the conditions in this USC Men’s Rugby Student-Athlete Code of Conduct, may result in sanctions, up to and including suspension or dismissal from the team.